Tag Archives: wellbeing

Art Therapy Workshop

You are invited to an Art Therapy Workshop with a focus on mental health & wellbeing on Thursday, 10th May – 11am till 1pm

Light refreshments provided – All are welcome, no previous art experience necessary.

For more information, please see our Facebook Event, or contact contact Rachael (rachael@lass.org.uk) or call us on 0116 2559995

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FREE TRAINING: HIV, Health & Wellbeing

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When we talk about mental wellbeing, we mean more than just happiness.  We know that physical and mental wellbeing are closely related.

Of course, feeling happy is a part of mental wellbeing but it is far from the whole. There is a deeper kind of wellbeing, which is about living in a way that is good for you and good for others around you.

Feelings of contentment, enjoyment, confidence and engagement with the world are all a part of mental wellbeing. Self-esteem and self-confidence are, too.  So is a feeling that you can do the things you want to do.  And so are good relationships, which bring joy to you and those around you.

Wellbeing and society

Over the last 50 years, we in Britain have become richer. Despite this, evidence from population surveys – in which people were asked to rate their own happiness or mental wellbeing – shows that mental wellbeing has not improved.

This suggests that many of the things we often think will improve our mental wellbeing – such as more possessions, more money to spend or expensive holidays – on their own do not lead to a lasting improvement in the way we feel about ourselves and our lives.

The message is clear: it’s time to rethink wellbeing.

Wellbeing in your life

Many factors influence our wellbeing. Evidence shows that the actions we take and the way we think have the biggest impact.  It can help to think about “being well” as something you do, rather than something you are.  The more you put in, the more you are likely to get out and the first thing you can do for your own wellbeing is become curious about it!

FREE TRAINING

We’re offering a free ‘HIV, Health & Wellbeing’ session .  The aim of this sessuin is to explore how overall health and wellbeing can be affected by being diagnosed with, living with or affected by HIV.  The session will explore different approaches to increase health & wellbeing for ourselves and for people we interact or work with.

This session will be of interest and benefit for people who are affected by HIV, those who work with people living with or affected by HIV and those who are involved in different wellbeing issues and solutions.

Date: Tuesday, 23rd June 2015
Time: 10:00 – 12:00am

To book, please download and complete this booking form and email it to, training@lass.org.uk.

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Boys who like boys: A survey of understanding about sex

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HIV diagnoses among young gay and bisexual men have more than doubled in the past 10 years and rates of HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men remain constant, with no evidence of decline. (Get the data)

We know that there is now more opportunity for gay and bisexual men to meet sexual partners and form relationships; however this is not being matched with increased provision of information and support around relationships, safer sex, HIV and their general health and well-being.

Much more can be done to better meet the health and wellbeing needs of young gay and bisexual men to help reduce HIV transmission and to improve their general health and well being irrespective of HIV. Part of this is responding specifically to support and information related need. For example, research also shows that sex and relationships education (SRE) in schools is often inaccessible and not relevant to the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) young people, which threatens to undermine this group’s right to education.

In addition, where young gay and bisexual men might conventionally learn about safer sex, relationships and HIV, such as educational settings, they can experience marginalisation and homophobic prejudice.  (See the School Report, Stonewall 2012)

The National AIDS Trust (NAT) have designed a survey looking at where and how young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM)  source information, advice or support about sexuality, sex and relationships, safer sex, and HIV; whether they think these sources are helpful; and what types of additional information and support they would like more of. The survey will also assess respondents knowledge around HIV, safer sex and human rights, and reported sexual behaviour. The survey is targeted at young gay and bisexual men aged 14 – 19.

Access the survey (and enter for a chance to win a £75 voucher) by clicking this link.

Take our survey of understanding about sex

 

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Leicestershire Community Calendar 2012

LASS’s Social Enterprise Well For Living launched a new initiative to help raise funds and awareness for Community Organisations and Charities.

Twelve different organisations, came together and developed a Community Calendar designed to encourage community involvement and help raise funds in this difficult climate.   The calendar also highlights important dates for the sector, such as Volunteers Week.

All Charities featured work to improve the lives of people living in Leicester and Leicestershire, and all are featured together in a calendar to display their good work throughput the year.

Read more about it at Well For Living.  http://www.wellforliving.co.uk/

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Leicestershire Community Calendar 2012

LASS’s Social Enterprise Well For Living launched a new initiative to help raise funds and awareness for Community Organisations and Charities.

Twelve different organisations, came together and developed a Community Calendar designed to encourage community involvement and help raise funds in this difficult climate.   The calendar also highlights important dates for the sector, such as Volunteers Week.

All Charities featured work to improve the lives of people living in Leicester and Leicestershire, and all are featured together in a calendar to display their good work throughput the year.

Read more about it at Well For Living.  http://www.wellforliving.co.uk/

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Bike Ability & Maintenance

  • Are you interested in being fit?
  • Would you like to reduce your carbon footprint?

If so, come and join the bike ability & maintenance Project, you may be entitled to a FREE BIKE or a bike a reduced cost.  Bikes for disabled and “crank-drive & tricycles” are also available.  The course cost is £2:00 for the entire course.

There are 3 levels to the course:

  • Level 1 (Basic skills) – Off road training, starting with safety check on bikes, on tarmac, covering  manoeuvring, signalling
  • Level 2 (Roads) – On quiet road training, out in small groups, covering all aspects of ‘on road’ cycling
  • Level 3 (Built up areas and roundabouts) – On busy road training, one instructor to two, covering all aspects of cycling and maintenance.

Places are allocated on a first come first served basis. The course will be 6 to 8 weeks from start to finish and certificates will be awarded to those who successfully complete the course

For more information please contact: Juliet or Chaz by email or telephone 0116 255 9995.

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Meditate To Live Longer

The benefits of meditation are many, as anyone who meditates knows and a good study from a meditation centre in Colorado, US, suggests that the practice can actually add years to your life.

Reported effects of meditation include lowering blood pressure, healing psoriasis, boosting immunity in those who are vaccinated or have cancer, preventing relapse into recurrent depression, plus slowing down the progression of HIV.

What’s more, it seems that meditation can now actually help our cells to survive in the body for longer.

The answer lies in our telomeres – a vital component of every cell. They play a key role in the ageing of cells. Every time a cell divides, they get shorter unless an enzyme called telomerase builds them up again.

People with short telomeres are at greater risk of heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, depression and osteoporosis. They also die younger.

The study shows after a meditation course, people had significantly higher levels of the enzyme present suggesting their telomeres were ­being protected. This changes our view of meditation as simply a state of relaxation. It’s a lifesaver.

Brain studies show that meditation can even trigger physical changes in brain centres involved in learning, memory, emotional regulation, thinking and mood control.

It just so happens that chronic stress will shortern our telomeres causing cell ageing.

The action of meditation is to de-stress us and in doing so, protect our telomeres.

The two kinds of meditation that have been studied are mindfulness meditation, where you become acutely aware of your thoughts and your surroundings, and compassion meditation, where you focus on feelings of love and affection for others.

Both of these types cut down on the stress hormone cortisol. Most of us don’t have time to spend months meditating, but there are mini-meditations we can do like focusing on breathing and being aware of our surroundings several times a day.

While meditation may be effective in reducing stress and in protecting your telomeres, there are other ways if you have no interest in meditation. Exercise can buffer the effects of stress on telomeres and so do stress management programmes.

Psychologists would say that meditation gives you an increased sense of control and purpose in life, and these two things are more important than meditation itself.

Just doing something we enjoy and love – be it meditating, gardening, listening to music or painting – will go a long way to protect us from stress and even help us to live longer.

Source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/advice/miriam/2011/05/19/meditate-to-live-longer-115875-23139547/
Further reading: http://www.learn-meditation-techniques.org/
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