Tag Archives: treatment

A patient’s journey through their hepatitis C treatment and care.

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This article is a guest post by David Rowlands, see toward the bottom for contact details.

Insight 7: “Motivation is key”
(Treatment Week 4 of 12)

When I first started treatment I had a number of blood tests, one measuring the “viral load” which showed the amount of hepatitis C present within my blood. At this time my viral load was showing to be 44,270,000, for me this was a very high result and I felt anxious about my next blood tests which were 2 weeks into my treatment. I have now received these blood results and I have had a huge reduction in my viral load. This is fantastic news and now is showing at 452.

Feeling Anxious

I felt anxious about having my blood tests, this is totally normal. I find speaking to a close friend or family before or after getting results does help and you as you are able to air any concerns you maybe having.

Feeling motivated

Receiving these results has motivated me. I am taking the correct prescribed medication at the correct times and these results are showing this. These results are helping me to stay on track of my treatment.

Not every patents viral load drops so quickly. I would contact you healthcare team or AbbVie Care, if you do have any treatment concerns. They may be able to help and support you to make the changes needed, I am sure you will want to achieve the best outcomes from your hepatitis C therapy and making small amends to when or how you take your treatment could be an option.

What motivates me to stay on track?

  • I have high chance of curing my hepatitis C.
  • I feel better now, than in a long time.
  • I might stop feeling so exhausted after clearing my hepatitis C.
    Already I have got rid of the brain fog I was experiencing.
  • I can improve my liver health.
  • I can drink alcohol again when I have completed treatment.
  • I won’t need to worry about passing hepatitis C onto someone else.
  • I won’t have to worry about how to tell people I have hepatitis C anymore.
  • I can live free from fear of serious liver disease or liver cancer in the future.

Motivational messages to help you stay on track

The AbbVie Care patient support programme offers motivational messages throughout your treatment. The programme tailors the support a patients gets using patient activation measure (PAM) score. This score (low, medium and high) will determine the number of messages you receive through your treatment.

Here are some examples you may receive

Week 2 (High and medium PAM score)
“Hello from AbbVie Care. Well done on getting through your first week and welcome to AbbVie Care. We are here to support you if you need us in addition to your specialist team. Call us on 0800 1488322”

Week 3 (Low PAM score)
”Hello from AbbVie Care. Try to keep a positive frame of mind. Think about something that makes you smile or link up with someone who can support you if you are struggling”

Week 4 (Low PAM score)
“Hello from AbbVie Care. Well done on getting to 4 weeks, you’re doing really well. Only 8 weeks left to go till you complete treatment. Remember every single dose counts for the best chance of a good result”

Try something new

It’s the last thing you want to be doing when you don’t feel one hundred percent, but I have found trying something new has given me more energy. Running, walking, and cycling has given me fresh air, even if it has been for a few minutes.

I feel it has improved my moods, stress, and physical health, but also made me sleep better in the evenings. If you don’t feel like you have so much energy, read a new book or learn a news skill, use this treatment experience to do something new, explore something you have always wanted to.

New week…..

My insight will be focusing on “side-effects” I believe this is an important topic to discuss to look at what minimal side-effects I am experiencing and how I addressing these.

About the author:

David Rowlands is the director of Design-Redefined.co.uk, delivering effective healthcare communications to enable people with HIV and/or hepatitis C (HCV) to become better engaged with their treatment and care.

Drawing on his established networks and collaboration with partners, David is able to bring healthcare together, by engaging patients & organisations, healthcare providers, physicians, stakeholders & policy makers.

Contact David via Email, Twitter, or visit his website.

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One in six people accessing HIV care are aged 55 or over

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Treatment improvements, ongoing transmission and a steady increase in new diagnoses have contributed to an increase in the number of people living with diagnosed HIV.

According to a new report from Public Health England, there were 85,489 people being seen for HV care across the UK in 2014. “The age of people accessing care for HIV continues to increase, with almost one in six now aged over 55,” it adds. “The aging cohort of people living with HIV emphasises the importance of integrated care pathways to manage co-morbidities and other complications.”

Other data in the report includes:

  • There were 6,151 new diagnoses in 2014, a slight increase from 2013
  • The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) newly diagnosed with HIV is increasing, from 2,860 men in 2010 to 3,360 men diagnosed HIV-positive in 2014
  • New diagnoses acquired through heterosexual sex has declined (from 3,440 in 2010 to 2,490 in 2014), largely due to a reduction in diagnoses among black African men and women (1,801 in 2010 to 1,044 in 2014)
  • Of all people attending for care in 2014, 91% were on antiretrovial therapy (ART), “of whom 95% were virally suppressed and unlikely to be infectious to others
  • 41% of those accessing HIV care are in London.

“A major challenge for the UK remains the timely diagnosis of HIV infection in order to start lifesaving ART and prevent onwards transmission of infection. Two out of five people newly diagnosed with HIV in 2014 had ‘late stage’ HIV, evidenced by a CD4 count below 350, and this remains stubbornly and unacceptably high (56% in 2005),” says the report.

A fifth (21%) of English local authorities had a diagnosed HIV prevalence above 2 per 1,000 in 2014, the threshold for expanded testing into general practice new registrants and hospital admissions. “This included all but one London borough. There is an urgent need to increase HIV testing opportunities and uptake for people living in these areas, in line with national HIV testing guidelines.”

Download your copy of the report here.

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Drugging Our Way Out of the HIV Epidemic

When antiretroviral drug cocktails hit the scene in 1996, they were so effective they became known as ‘the Lazarus drug.’ Many AIDS patients recovered seemingly overnight. Over the past 15 years, these drugs have saved the lives of millions of people infected with HIV. Several new studies suggest antiretrovirals could save millions more if we start using them for prevention as well as treatment.

Last July, researchers reported that a vaginal gel laced with an antiretroviral called tenofovir reduced HIV acquisition among South African women by 39% overall and by 54% in women who used the gel faithfully. Then, in November, a separate team of researchers reported that an oral antiretroviral pill taken daily reduced the risk of HIV infection among men who have sex with men by 44%. This year, on May 11, researchers announced the results of another study. They found that HIV-infected individuals — both men and women — who took antiretroviral drugs were a whopping 96% less likely to pass the virus on to their partners than individuals who didn’t take the drugs. The results are preliminary, but Myron Cohen, the HIV researcher who led the study and spoke on Monday at the New York Academy of Sciences, said he is confident that the large effect will hold.

These fantastic results beg the question: Can we drug our way out of the HIV epidemic?

Researchers have long suspected that people who take antiretrovirals are less likely to pass HIV on to their sexual partners. The idea makes a lot of biological sense. Antiretroviral drugs stop HIV from replicating, which means fewer copies of the virus floating around in HIV patients’ blood and, presumably, their genital secretions. But the hypothesis had never been proven in a randomized clinical trial. So in 2005, Cohen began a study to test the hypothesis.

He and his colleagues recruited 1,763 discordant couples—meaning one person was infected with HIV and the other wasn’t—in Botswana, Brazil, India, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Thailand, the US, and Zimbabwe. They randomly assigned each couple to one of two groups. In the first group, HIV-infected individuals received antiretrovirals right away. In the second group, the researchers more or less followed the standard treatment guidelines, delaying treatment until the disease progressed.

On April 28, the independent committee charged with overseeing the trial met at the National Institutes of Health for their tenth meeting. At each meeting, the committee members would review the data and decide whether the trial should continue. After this most recent meeting, they told Cohen they had a recommendation, but they couldn’t yet tell him what it was. Cohen, who has never been allowed to see the results, assumed the worst—that the early treatment hadn’t worked. Then he received a phone call. The committee told him they had seen such a dramatic benefit that they wanted to release the results.

On May 11, Cohen held a press conference to announce the results. During the study, 28 individuals had become infected with their partner’s strain of virus. But only one of those infections occurred in the early treatment group. The other 27 infections occurred in couples not taking antiretrovirals.

Ever since the press conference, Cohen has been inundated with media requests. The success is well deserved. HIV prevention researchers have been working long and hard for decades with little to show for it (One notable exception: The 2007/2008 circumcision trials, which found that male circumcision can cut a man’s risk of contracting HIV by 50%).

On Monday, Cohen compared the trial to “pushing a boulder up a hill.” But I think the most daunting challenge lies ahead. How do you take all these positive results – not just from Cohen’s study, but from the others as well – and develop an effective public health strategy?

Cohen found that early treatment can prevent new infections. So putting everyone who has HIV on treatment immediately should dramatically curb the spread of HIV. But antiretrovirals are expensive. Advocate for earlier treatment, and you dramatically increase the number of people who need pills. According to the World Health Organization, roughly 33 million people are infected with HIV. Of those, five million are receiving treatment. Another 10 million aren’t taking antiretrovirals but should be. So to prevent new infections, we need provide treatment to between 10 million and 28 million people. Who will pay for their medicine? Many of the people infected with HIV barely earn enough to feed themselves, let alone purchase expensive drugs.

And what about all the individuals who are infected with HIV but don’t know it? People seem to be most infectious right after they become infected themselves. Studies suggest that anywhere between 8% and 40% of new infections are caused by people who are in this “acute” stage. But people with acute infections often test negative for the virus because they haven’t yet developed antibodies. So how do you find these people?

Here’s another issue. Millions of people infected with HIV depend on antiretrovirals for their survival. So if we want to use antiretrovirals for prevention, we need to find a way to do it without creating more drug resistance. How?

Although answering these questions may prove challenging, I’m [sic] not suggesting we should throw in the towel. Science is giving us the data, now it’s up to us to decide how to use it. Antiretrovirals aren’t the long-awaited magic bullet that will end the HIV epidemic — we can’t drug our way out of this — but they can save lives and prevent new infections. It’s a start.

Via: http://www.lastwordonnothing.com/2011/05/18/drugging-our-way-out-of-the-hi-epidemic/
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