Tag Archives: transmission

A patient’s journey through their hepatitis C treatment and care.

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This article is a guest post by David Rowlands, see toward the bottom for contact details.

Insight 7: “Motivation is key”
(Treatment Week 4 of 12)

When I first started treatment I had a number of blood tests, one measuring the “viral load” which showed the amount of hepatitis C present within my blood. At this time my viral load was showing to be 44,270,000, for me this was a very high result and I felt anxious about my next blood tests which were 2 weeks into my treatment. I have now received these blood results and I have had a huge reduction in my viral load. This is fantastic news and now is showing at 452.

Feeling Anxious

I felt anxious about having my blood tests, this is totally normal. I find speaking to a close friend or family before or after getting results does help and you as you are able to air any concerns you maybe having.

Feeling motivated

Receiving these results has motivated me. I am taking the correct prescribed medication at the correct times and these results are showing this. These results are helping me to stay on track of my treatment.

Not every patents viral load drops so quickly. I would contact you healthcare team or AbbVie Care, if you do have any treatment concerns. They may be able to help and support you to make the changes needed, I am sure you will want to achieve the best outcomes from your hepatitis C therapy and making small amends to when or how you take your treatment could be an option.

What motivates me to stay on track?

  • I have high chance of curing my hepatitis C.
  • I feel better now, than in a long time.
  • I might stop feeling so exhausted after clearing my hepatitis C.
    Already I have got rid of the brain fog I was experiencing.
  • I can improve my liver health.
  • I can drink alcohol again when I have completed treatment.
  • I won’t need to worry about passing hepatitis C onto someone else.
  • I won’t have to worry about how to tell people I have hepatitis C anymore.
  • I can live free from fear of serious liver disease or liver cancer in the future.

Motivational messages to help you stay on track

The AbbVie Care patient support programme offers motivational messages throughout your treatment. The programme tailors the support a patients gets using patient activation measure (PAM) score. This score (low, medium and high) will determine the number of messages you receive through your treatment.

Here are some examples you may receive

Week 2 (High and medium PAM score)
“Hello from AbbVie Care. Well done on getting through your first week and welcome to AbbVie Care. We are here to support you if you need us in addition to your specialist team. Call us on 0800 1488322”

Week 3 (Low PAM score)
”Hello from AbbVie Care. Try to keep a positive frame of mind. Think about something that makes you smile or link up with someone who can support you if you are struggling”

Week 4 (Low PAM score)
“Hello from AbbVie Care. Well done on getting to 4 weeks, you’re doing really well. Only 8 weeks left to go till you complete treatment. Remember every single dose counts for the best chance of a good result”

Try something new

It’s the last thing you want to be doing when you don’t feel one hundred percent, but I have found trying something new has given me more energy. Running, walking, and cycling has given me fresh air, even if it has been for a few minutes.

I feel it has improved my moods, stress, and physical health, but also made me sleep better in the evenings. If you don’t feel like you have so much energy, read a new book or learn a news skill, use this treatment experience to do something new, explore something you have always wanted to.

New week…..

My insight will be focusing on “side-effects” I believe this is an important topic to discuss to look at what minimal side-effects I am experiencing and how I addressing these.

About the author:

David Rowlands is the director of Design-Redefined.co.uk, delivering effective healthcare communications to enable people with HIV and/or hepatitis C (HCV) to become better engaged with their treatment and care.

Drawing on his established networks and collaboration with partners, David is able to bring healthcare together, by engaging patients & organisations, healthcare providers, physicians, stakeholders & policy makers.

Contact David via Email, Twitter, or visit his website.

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One in six people accessing HIV care are aged 55 or over

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Treatment improvements, ongoing transmission and a steady increase in new diagnoses have contributed to an increase in the number of people living with diagnosed HIV.

According to a new report from Public Health England, there were 85,489 people being seen for HV care across the UK in 2014. “The age of people accessing care for HIV continues to increase, with almost one in six now aged over 55,” it adds. “The aging cohort of people living with HIV emphasises the importance of integrated care pathways to manage co-morbidities and other complications.”

Other data in the report includes:

  • There were 6,151 new diagnoses in 2014, a slight increase from 2013
  • The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) newly diagnosed with HIV is increasing, from 2,860 men in 2010 to 3,360 men diagnosed HIV-positive in 2014
  • New diagnoses acquired through heterosexual sex has declined (from 3,440 in 2010 to 2,490 in 2014), largely due to a reduction in diagnoses among black African men and women (1,801 in 2010 to 1,044 in 2014)
  • Of all people attending for care in 2014, 91% were on antiretrovial therapy (ART), “of whom 95% were virally suppressed and unlikely to be infectious to others
  • 41% of those accessing HIV care are in London.

“A major challenge for the UK remains the timely diagnosis of HIV infection in order to start lifesaving ART and prevent onwards transmission of infection. Two out of five people newly diagnosed with HIV in 2014 had ‘late stage’ HIV, evidenced by a CD4 count below 350, and this remains stubbornly and unacceptably high (56% in 2005),” says the report.

A fifth (21%) of English local authorities had a diagnosed HIV prevalence above 2 per 1,000 in 2014, the threshold for expanded testing into general practice new registrants and hospital admissions. “This included all but one London borough. There is an urgent need to increase HIV testing opportunities and uptake for people living in these areas, in line with national HIV testing guidelines.”

Download your copy of the report here.

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Mother-to-child HIV Transmission Rates Drop in South Africa

The rates of mother-to-child HIV transmission have dropped in South Africa, according to a recent national survey.

According to the poll by the South African Medical Research Council, the rate in the country is now 3.5 per cent. (via Plus News)

Researchers said by 2015, they hope there will be no more vertical HIV transmission in the African nation.

Around 40 per cent of children born to HIV-positive mothers could contract the virus before or during birth, if they do not have access to antiretrovirals provided through public services for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission.

The survey results were released at the SA AIDS 2011 Conference, and they show a reduction of around five per cent in the transmission rates shown in previous surveys.

Recently, Zimbabwe announced pregnant women in the African country will be given free blood transfusions during delivery in a bid to prevent maternal and infant mortality, particularly among women who have HIV/AIDS.

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