Tag Archives: social

Celebrities Step Out For Top Gastronomic Parties To Raise £80,000 For People Living With HIV

Celebrity guests attending HIV and sexual health charity Terrence Higgins Trust’s The Supper Club event last Tuesday night helped to raise around £80,000 to support people living with HIV. Famous names attending a variety of exclusive London dinner parties included Cilla Black, Graham Norton, Rory Bremner, Russell Tovey, Sean Pertwee, Dan Gillespie Sells, Charlie Condou, Francis Barber, Ronni Ancona and MP Nick Herbert.

The Supper Club saw 45 first class dinner parties taking place simultaneously in some of London’s finest restaurants including Scott’s, Mr Chow, China Tang, J.Sheekey, Massimo and The Greenhouse, all donated free of charge for Terrence Higgins Trust.

After dinner, guests were chauffeured to a glamorous, cocktail-filled after party at Piccadilly’s Café De Paris, hosted by Coronation Street star Charlie Condou. Guests drank Honey Ryder and Passion Fruit Martini vodka cocktails sponsored by Belvedere and danced to entertainment from five-piece Camden indie disco outfit, Kentish Fire.

Genevieve Edwards, Terrence Higgins Trust’s Executive Director of Fundraising, said:“Thank you to everyone who made The Supper Club such a huge success, with the very finest food and drink London has to offer and a fabulous after party. Our supporters once again did us proud with a show-stopper of an event which has raised huge amounts of money to support people living with HIV.

“With World AIDS Day just round the corner it’s a vital time to raise awareness of HIV so we’re delighted so many of our guests turned out in force again last night to show their support for this cause.”

Original Article via THT

So now you’ve heard what the celebs are doing to help raise money for people living with HIV.  You may wonder if there’s anything in your area similar where you can get some good food, get together with a good charitable cause and donate to your local HIV Charity.. Ohh that us!

Check out our “Fancy A Curry” page for details of our fundraising evening at Cuisine of India restaurant.

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Dating, HIV & You

Dating is a tricky area of vulnerability, intense emotions and fear, as well as a very real risk of rejection for anyone. When HIV and/or AIDS is involved, the vulnerability, fear or risk of rejection and intensity of emotions can be ramped up high enough to cause serious anxiety.

Some people who have been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS prefer to date others with the same diagnosis. This can bring tremendous relief, as discussions around this topic are not, for the most part, bound to be taboo, and the physical, emotional, spiritual, family and medical struggles and challenges that are shared may create a profound sense of communion and understanding.

Others are open to dating people without a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and this brings up a whole host of confusing issues and multiple questions which must be answered.

Should you disclose your diagnosis? If so, when might that be appropriate? If not, is that all right, or even fair or ethical to your partner or potential partner? If you are taking medication and practicing safe sex, are you still contagious and can you spread this disease to a potential partner?

These questions bring dinner, movies, music, romance and long walks on the beach to a whole other level, one in which illness and questions of contagion and mortality are turned over and over in one’s mind. The sources at the bottom of this page can lead you to find answers to many of these questions, and I will attempt to briefly touch on them here.

Firstly, any dating relationship would thrive in an atmosphere of honesty. After all, if you are looking for a real connection with another human being and not merely for a quick romp in the bedroom, having HIV/AIDS and living with that reality would be a very important part of your life.

While you don’t need to disclose this on the first, second, or even third date, if things are getting more serious or leading to a sexually intimate relationship, disclosure is important. Not only that, but if you are dating someone whom you feel would not be able to handle hearing about this condition, you must ask yourself why you are putting yourself in that position to begin with.

Why are you choosing to date a person who will not accept you in your life as it is today?

Part of embracing yourself, loving yourself, and getting involved in an emotionally healthy relationship with someone who values you is about accepting your diagnosis and being involved with people who can accept it as well.

Low-risk sex means using a condom all the time, a practice everyone (straight, gay, bisexual or transgendered) should be engaging in while dating anyway. With self-confidence, safety, romance and honesty in mind, going out into the dating world may be just a little less daunting and a little more exciting.

Original Article via EmpowHER

Have an iOS device?, there’s a wealth of apps available for you as reported previously, another app of note and topical for this post is PositiveSingles by successfulmatch.com. PositiveSingles is the world’s largest, most active and most trusted iOS app for people living with HIV and other STI’s

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Fancy a Curry? – Join Us For Social Evening At The Cuisine Of India Restaurant

Syed Rahman, who runs the Cuisine Of India restaurant is hoping to raise £100,000 for local charity by hosting Curry Nights.  In the last three years he’s managed to raise a whopping £20,000 for charities such as Save The Children, Derbyshire Leicestershire and Rutland Air Ambulance, The Laura Centre, Loros and many more.

Last year, LASS enjoyed a social evening of delicious food with friends and raised around £500 which assist our causes, namely, Foodbank, The David Manley Fund and Winnie’s Fund for Children.

The money is raised by special events held at Cuisine of India where groups of people pay £16 each for a meal and half the money from each night is donated charity.

Other benefactors include the Motor Neurone Disease Association and thousands of pounds have gone to Children with Cancer, Rainbow’s Children’s Hospice and Breast Cancer Care.

This year, we’re delighted to invite you again to another Curry Night held at the restaurant located at Kelmarsh Avenue, Wigston and if you would like to join us, please call on 0116 2559995 for tickets.

We know from experience that tickets sell quickly, so please book early to avoid disappointment.  Full menu and testimonials are available at Cuisine Of India’s website.

We hope to see you there – 7:30pm on  Monday, 21st November.

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LASS Football Tournament

The LASS ‘Know Your HIV Status’ football tournament at the Emerald centre in Leicester on 24 July 2011 achieved more than the expected outcomes.

The focus of the tournament was to raise awareness of HIV and AIDS, ‘kick out’ stigma and discrimination and rapid HIV testing among African communities. The target audience was the African men. This group was specifically targeted because LASS statistics over the past 2 years have shown them to be reluctant to be involved in HIV and AIDS issues and were not forthcoming when it came to HIV testing.

The idea of hosting a football tournament was a way of bringing many African men together as they are lovers of the game. It proved effective as 12 African male teams participated and 4 other teams were turned down because the desired number for the event had been exceeded. The teams were from Leicester, Coventry, Birmingham, Nottingham, Milton Keynes, Luton and Stevenage. Participants were from the following African countries: Gambia, Somalia, Nigeria, Malawi, Cameroon and Zimbabwe.

The LASS rapid HIV testing van was on site. There were 20 ‘I Know My HIV Status’ bronze medals as an incentive for the first 20 African men to test for HIV. The medals proved the ideal catalyst for the men to test for HIV as those tested came out of the van brandishing them and then hung them onto their necks and moved right across all the grounds boasting of knowing their HIV status. Some came out singing in jubilation and displayed dancing skills as they celebrated. They challenged their friends to follow likewise and so not wanting to be left out a queue of men lined near the testing van waiting for their turn.

Twenty nine African men and three African women were tested for HIV. Celia Fisher who was the tester on site and the sexual health coordinator for LASS conceded, ‘This is a record, the largest number of people tested in a single day since the inception of the community rapid HIV testing at LASS in June 2009. Some of those tested left their contact details so they could have certificates of the tests sent to them as proof to their wives, partners, friends and family. Eric Gore, a LASS sexual health African communities outreach worker went around the grounds giving team, group and individual HIV awareness interventions and emphasising and the importance of a HIV test.

The day’s atmosphere was full of scenes of joy from those tested and others watching the games. All three pitches were in use and from the round robin the matches went straight into the semi-finals. Luton and Coventry Warriors battled it out in the final and the latter emerged victors. They scooped the winners’ trophy and 17 gold medals whilst the losing finalists Luton walked away with 17 silver medals. All the three match referees were each awarded a god medal. ‘This was the best of all the tournaments we have officiated at, it was well organised and there was discipline from the word go,’ commented Lazarus the chief referee.

There were lots of BBQ for the participating teams and match officials. Zimbabwe Association volunteers prepared food for the teams. Gochi Gochi Africa was selling BBQ including spare ribs, steak, sausages, roast corn etc and the ‘Chaka laka’ chillies.

Social networking continued late in the evening to as late as 11 pm with members of the public and the teams enjoying cold drinks served by the Emerald centre bar staff.

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