Tag Archives: food

‘Tis The Season For Overindulgence ♫

Boxing Day Buffet Lunch Christmas Tree and Log Fir

Many people overdo it at Christmas, celebrating with friends and family, non-stop eating, drinking and late nights can leave us feeling tired, sluggish and quite often, a little poorly if we’ve eaten or drunk too much.  A lot of people with HIV generally have a healthy diet and lifestyle, and may only overindulge once or twice a year, if that’s you, then you’ll have no problems going back to eating sensibly after the holiday season, festive excesses aren’t likely to have a long-term, damaging effect on your health or your weight.  However, the short term strain that too much rich food and alcohol puts on your body can still leave you feeling bloated and out of sorts, when all you need is your body to get back to normal.

An average person can consume as much as 7,000 calories on Christmas Day, (that’s three and a half times the recommended daily intake for a woman.)  As well as dehydrating us and putting a strain on our liver, excessive consumption of alcohol can also make us feel unwell, and ill-equipped to handle a detox correctly.

When the festivities are finally over, there are a few sensible, gimmick-free steps that you can take to help you and your body get back on the road to feeling better.

Get Moving

It’s a cliché, but exercise really is the best way to make your body and metabolism work together so it can make use of the nutrition it’s received over the past few days.  A 30 minute walk is good for your heart, lungs, muscles and bones, as well as improving your mood and giving you a sense of wellbeing.  So instead of watching reruns of Christmas TV, get yourself off the sofa and go out for a stroll!

Be kind to your body

If you’ve over-indulged in rich, fatty, sugary foods with alcohol, if your inclined, your body needs time to recuperate.  You should try to avoid red meats, dairy products and processed foods and opt for lots of fruit and vegetables and wholegrain foods instead.  And one of the best things to drink is water (no surprise there), but did you know that the additional salt and alcohol we consume dehydrates the body, so it’s best to re-hydrate.  If you can’t manage full glasses, frequently just try a glass of water with your cup of tea, coffee or soft drink.  Combined with exercise, you’ll start to feel the benefits almost immediately!

Don’t Forget Protein!

Proteins are extremely important for your diet as they are the building blocks of your cells, muscles, organs, and more importantly, your immune system!  If your body doesn’t get the protein it needs from food, it will start using the protein it has stored up which can result in a weakening of your immune system.  A good rule of thumb for a HIV positive person is 100 to 150 grams of protein per day for men, and 80 to 100 grams of protein per day for women.

Energy & Fat (yes, fat)!

You can rebuild your energy by eating complex carbohydrates, that’s food items such as grains and beans, rice and pasta.  While eating complex carbohydrates, try to focus on foods such as white bread, pasta and potatoes.  These carbohydrates are richer in nutrients and the body absorbs them slower, helping to sustain you while you are between meals.

While carbohydrates help you get energy, fat is what helps the body store energy for later use.  For HIV positive people, doctors recommend a fat intake of less than 30 percent of your daily caloric intake.  Also make sure you are getting the appropriate amounts of fat, sometimes, people with HIV experience an increase in cholesterol because of interactions with medications so it’s important to watch your fat consumption. It is recommended that of that 30 percent, 7 percent be saturated fat from foods like whole milk, butter and fatty meats. The rest of the fat should come from nuts, fish, seeds, canola oil and soy.

If you’d like to know more about HIV and Nutrition, visit Avert, who have comprehensive information and advice on diet, supplements and nutrition.

You can also visit Web MD, National AIDS Trust or Positive Nation for some helpful nutrition information or learn about about eating a balanced diet on the NHS Choices website at: www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/the-eatwell-guide.aspx.

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Soy sauce molecules effectively fight HIV

soy-sauce-sq-bowl

More than a decade after a Japanese soy sauce manufacturer said it had discovered a molecule in its sauce that could be used to fight HIV, the findings have been confirmed by university scientists.

According to a team of virologists at the University of Missouri, a flavor-enhancing molecule found in soy sauce – called EFdA – is up to 70 times more powerful than typical drugs like Tenofovir, which is often used as a first line of defense before the disease builds up a resistance.

“Patients who are treated for HIV infections with Tenofovir, eventually develop resistance to the drugs that prevent an effective or successful defense against the virus,” said Stefan Sarafianos, associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology in the University of Missouri School of Medicine, and a virologist at the Bond Life Sciences Center.

“EFdA, the molecule we are studying, is less likely to cause resistance in HIV patients because it is more readily activated and is less quickly broken down by the body as similar existing drugs.”

The discovery of the powerful molecule dates back to 1998, when Japanese soy sauce company Yamasa established a division of food scientists with the intention of studying how the body’s immune system reacted to the chemicals contained in food. According to Vocativ, the company discovered the potential of EFdA in 2001, when it noticed the make-up of the molecule bore a striking resemblance to existing HIV drugs on the market.

Thirteen years later, that research has been verified. When it comes to individuals whose bodies haven’t developed a resistance to Tenofovir, the soy sauce molecule is 10 times more effective.

“Not only does EFdA work on resistant HIV, it works better on HIV that has not become Tenofovir resistant,” Sarafianos said.

According to the University of Missouri’s science blog, EFdA’s effectiveness was also proven in monkeys by Sarafianos and other researchers like Michael Parniak of the University of Pittsburgh and the National Institutes of Health’s Hiroaki Mitsuya. In 2012, the three researchers showed that even in animals nearing death, EFdA allowed for rapid and impressive recovery.

“These animals were so lethargic, so ill, that they were scheduled to be euthanized when EFdA was administered,” Parniak told the blog. “Within a month they were bouncing around in their cages, looking very happy and their virus load dropped to undetectable levels. That shows you the activity of the molecule; it’s so active that resistance doesn’t come in as much of a factor with it.”

Moving forward, the researchers hope to apply EFdA most effectively in preventative measures, which the team sees as the best way to halt the spread of the disease. Continued research into the molecule could lead to other breakthroughs and even better ways to battle HIV.

“We want to understand how long EFdA stays in the bloodstream and cells,” Parniak said. “If we understand structurally why this drug is so potent it allows us to maybe develop additional molecules equally potent and a combination of those molecules could be a blockbuster.”

Story via RT

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Cookery Demonstration

Tomato-and-Red-Lentil-Soup

Tomorrow, (Tuesday 8th April) we’re providing a simple cookery lesson for volunteers and members of LASS.

Our visiting dietician Jen and our Cafe coordinator Travis will be on hand to show how to cook a nutritional and healthy red lentil and tomato soup on a budget.

Studies find that eating tomatoes regularly can reduce the risk of men getting prostate cancer and they are packed full of vitamins – including vitamins A, C and E.  Tomatoes also contain flavonoids (natural anti-inflammatories), potassium and other mineral salts.

Lentils are a good source of protein which help to lower cholesterol in addition to slowing down digestion and stabilizing blood sugar levels. This can be especially helpful for those with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia.

Join us tomorrow from 11:30 in the cafe tomorrow, and we’ll break bread together.  Contact Chaz or Rachael on 0116 2559995 for more information.

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Raise awareness of HIV and Poverty in your area

chickpea

Remember this article where we mentioned that thousands of people with HIV have been left struggling in poverty by the Government’s welfare reforms?  (Some people can’t even afford basic food which is need to take with HIV medicines).

In that, we shared the Terrence Higgins Trust report on HIV and Poverty, it’s worth a read, click here for your copy of the report.  It’s based on evidence gathered from the THT’s Hardship Fund and The Food Chain.

The factors that push people into poverty are varied and complex. Having HIV can contribute to a deteriorating financial situation. In turn financial hardship can lead to more significant health problems for those living with HIV.

Local councils, including Leicester City and Leicestershire County councils have a responsibility for the health and wellbeing of the people in their community. It is vital that they know about the needs of people living with HIV in our area so that they can factor them into their strategies for health and support.  They need our support, otherwise how can they plan their budgets effectively if we don’t inform them of the issues we face locally?

You can help raise awareness by emailing your Cabinet Member for Health to tell them about the HIV and Poverty Report and ask them whether the needs of people living with HIV are a part of their planned health and support services.

The Terrence Higgins Trust have created a simple email which you can send to your Cabinet Member for Health. Simply complete your details an email will be generated which you can customise before sending.

So before you click away and read another post, or share this to your networks.. ask yourself, “What can I do“? – You can click here and email your local Cabinet Member for Health! We encourage you do so.

Thanks,

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‘Tis The Season For Overindulgence ♫

Boxing Day Buffet Lunch Christmas Tree and Log Fir

Many people overdo it at Christmas, celebrating with friends and family, non-stop eating, drinking and late nights can leave us feeling tired, sluggish and quite often, a little poorly if we’ve eaten or drunk too much.  A lot of people with HIV generally have a healthy diet and lifestyle, and may only overindulge once or twice a year, if that’s you, then you’ll have no problems going back to eating sensibly after the holiday season, festive excesses aren’t likely to have a long-term, damaging effect on your health or your weight.  However, the short term strain that too much rich food and alcohol puts on your body can still leave you feeling bloated and out of sorts, when all you need is your body to get back to normal.

The average person can consume as much as 7,000 calories on Christmas Day, (that’s three and a half times the recommended daily intake for a woman.)  As well as dehydrating us and putting a strain on our liver, excessive consumption of alcohol can also make us feel unwell, and ill-equipped to handle a detox correctly.

When the festivities are finally over, there are a few sensible, gimmick-free steps that you can take to help you and your body get back on the road to feeling better.

Get Moving

It’s a cliché, but exercise really is the best way to make your body and metabolism work together so it can make use of the nutrition it’s received over the past few days.  A 30 minute walk is good for your heart, lungs, muscles and bones, as well as improving your mood and giving you a sense of wellbeing.  So instead of watching reruns of Christmas TV, get yourself off the sofa and go out for a stroll!

Be kind to your body

If you’ve over-indulged in rich, fatty, sugary foods with alcohol, if your inclined, your body needs time to recuperate.  You should try to avoid red meats, dairy products and processed foods and opt for lots of fruit and vegetables and wholegrain foods instead.  And one of the best things to drink is water (no surprise there), but did you know that the additional salt and alcohol we consume dehydrates the body, so it’s best to re-hydrate.  If you can’t manage full glasses, frequently just try a glass of water with your cup of tea, coffee or soft drink.  Combined with exercise, you’ll start to feel the benefits almost immediately!

Don’t Forget Protein!

Proteins are extremely important for your diet as they are the building blocks of your cells, muscles, organs, and more importantly, your immune system!  If your body doesn’t get the protein it needs from food, it will start using the protein it has stored up which can result in a weakening of your immune system.  A good rule of thumb for a HIV positive person is 100 to 150 grams of protein per day for men, and 80 to 100 grams of protein per day for women.

Energy & Fat (yes, fat)!

You can rebuild your energy by eating complex carbohydrates, that’s food items such as grains and beans, rice and pasta.  While eating complex carbohydrates, try to focus on foods such as white bread, pasta and potatoes.  These carbohydrates are richer in nutrients and the body absorbs them slower, helping to sustain you while you are between meals.

While carbohydrates help you get energy, fat is what helps the body store energy for later use.  For HIV positive people, doctors recommend a fat intake of less than 30 percent of your daily caloric intake.  Also make sure you are getting the appropriate amounts of fat, sometimes, people with HIV experience an increase in cholesterol because of interactions with medications so it’s important to watch your fat consumption. It is recommended that of that 30 percent, 7 percent be saturated fat from foods like whole milk, butter and fatty meats. The rest of the fat should come from nuts, fish, seeds, canola oil and soy.

If you’d like to know more about HIV and Nutrition, visit Avert, who have comprehensive information and advice on diet, supplements and nutrition.

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Discussions with a Dietitian: Fruit & Vegetables

Each month, a registered dietician from the NHS, visits LASS to offer helpful advice and information on food nutrition and healthy eating for people who live with HIV.  Our next is session is in a week, Friday 17th August (12:00 noon) and will focus on Fruit & Vegetables.  This is an opportunity to ask questions and speak with the dietitian directly about any concerns you may have.

What we eat affects our overall health. Food can help the body to fight infections. It also provides energy so that we can carry on leading active lives.

Eating healthily can prevent weight loss or weight gain. It can lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels, which helps to prevent diabetes and heart disease. Food can also help control some of the side-effects of medication.

This all means that good nutrition is an important part of living well with HIV, we do hope you’re able to join us next week.

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Discussions with a Dietitian: Sugary Foods

Each month, a registered dietician from the NHS, visits LASS to offer helpful advice and information on food nutrition and healthy eating for people who live with HIV.  Our next session “Sugary Foods” will be on Friday, 21st October 2011 from 12:00pm.  This is an opportunity to ask questions and speak with the dietitian directly about any concerns you may have.

What we eat affects our overall health. Food can help the body to fight infections. It also provides energy so that we can carry on leading active lives.

Eating healthily can prevent weight loss or weight gain. It can lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels, which helps to prevent diabetes and heart disease. Food can also help control some of the side-effects of medication.

This means that good nutrition is an important part of living well with HIV.

The challenge of change

When we first found out we had HIV, some of us realised that our diet was really unhealthy. But the thought of having to completely change our eating habits filled us with dread. It seemed such a big change.

But by making small, gradual changes, such as swapping white bread for brown, or by eating one piece of fruit each morning, it’s possible to start eating better. You could use THT’s ‘planning and managing change tool’ to help you.

What should we eat?

So what does eating healthily actually mean? For us it means eating like this.

Lots of:

  • fruit and vegetables
  • bread, cereals, potatoes and other carbohydrates

Moderate amounts of:

  • meat, fish and other proteins, such as eggs
  • milk and diary products

Less of:

  • foods that are high in fat, sugar and/or salt.
 Food type What we should know
Fruit and vegetables Ideally we should eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day with a mix of different colours. They don’t have to be fresh; frozen or canned are fine too.
Bread, cereals, potatoes and other carbohydrates Carbs should form the core of your meals. If you eat wholemeal, brown and high-fibre versions, they’ll keep you going for longer.
Meat, fish and other proteins, such as eggs Keep meat as lean as possible by cutting off visible fat and skin off the meat.
Milk and diary products Choose low fat versions where possible.
Foods high in fat High fat foods include butter, margarine, crisps, cakes and biscuits.
Food high in sugar Sugary foods include sweets, jam, cakes, puddings and most fizzy drinks.
Foods high in salt Check the labels on food for salt or sodium content.

 Get help from your clinic’s dietician

Most HIV clinics have a specialist dietician or nutritionist. If you ask to see one, they can give you detailed advice tailored to your needs and circumstances. They can also give you advice on taking vitamins and supplements or why not come to LASS on Friday 21st for our talk.

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