HIV in Gaza: “I know, so I am not afraid”

Palestine-flag-with-ribbon

Fifty-year-old Um Mohammad, a mother of nine, has been living with HIV for 16 years in the Gaza Strip in the occupied Palestinian territory. She was nursing her baby girl when tests revealed she was HIV positive.

“We found out that I got the HIV while I was still breastfeeding my youngest. I got it from my husband,” she says. “I was scared for my baby girl, but thank God, it was not transmitted to her. I was so relieved.”

Um Mohammad spoke at a training workshop for journalists in Gaza organized by the UNDP Programme of Assistance to the Palestinian People with financial support from the Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund). The training aimed at reducing stigma and provided accurate messages and facts on HIV.

According to the Ministry of Health in the occupied Palestinian territory, the cumulative number of patients with HIV and AIDS since 1987 has reached 72 cases, although problems with under-reporting and HIV surveillance systems means that accurate statistics in the Arab region are difficult to come by.

This is particularly true in Gaza. Out of 29 known cases of people living with HIV recorded in the Gaza Strip as per available statistics, only eight people are still alive and currently receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment and support through the UNDP-managed Global Fund programme. In the occupied Palestinian territory as a whole, 21 people with advanced HIV are receiving treatment and 20 persons living with HIV are provided psychosocial support.

The programme also includes critical awareness-raising sessions and stigma reduction activities with a special focus on religious leaders, the media and legal aid professionals. More than 2,000 people in the occupied Palestinian territory have received critical HIV testing and counselling sessions, including Um Mohammad.

“Many people are not aware how of HIV is transmitted”, she explains. HIV is transmitted through unprotected sex, transfusion of contaminated blood or from the use of non-sterile injecting equipment.

“I know, so I am not afraid,” she says. “I am able to share with my children their food and utensils and I kiss them good night like every mother. I do the same with my neighbours and relatives.”

Um Mohammad’s husband died four months after he was diagnosed with AIDS and she was left to provide for her family. “I became the mother and father of my nine children,” she says. “I brought them up the best way I can.”

UNDP is the Principal Recipient for Global Fund programmes in a number of countries. In the occupied Palestinian territory, working closely with the Ministry of Health and UN agencies, the Global Fund-supported HIV-programme has significantly contributed to preventing the spread of HIV, as well as to providing treatment and care services to persons living with HIV and AIDS.

The Global Fund has committed US$11 million to the project over a five year period (2009-2013). Today, thanks to the initiative’s efforts, 22 non-governmental organizations are providing HIV and AIDS prevention, awareness and support services in the Gaza Strip and West Bank.

“It is time now for our society to treat people living with HIV and AIDS like any person who has the right to live, work, learn and receive treatment when sick,” Um Mohammad says.

by Amar Bokhari, Reem Abu Shomar and Dania Darwish at the United Nations Development Programme (Link)

 All names in this article have been changed to protect the privacy of those involved

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

108 Delegates have died en route to Melbourne AIDS2014 summit on flight MH17

black_ribbon

MORE than 100 AIDS activists, researchers and health workers bound for a major conference in Melbourne were on the Malaysia Airlines flight downed in the Ukraine.

It is believed that delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference, due to begin on Sunday, will be informed today that 108 of their colleagues and family members died on MH17.

Stunned researchers, activists and development workers arriving at Melbourne Airport paid tribute to AIDS researcher Joep Lange and the other attendees believed killed aboard MH17.

Jonathan Quick, head of a not-for–profit medicine supply company working with the Global Fund and the US government in Africa and Latin America, described Professor Lange as a force for change in HIV/AIDS treatment.

“I remember meeting him back in the late 1990s. He was really driven at a time when there was not much going on in the way of treatment,” he said.

“This is a community in which individuals have moved mountains and it’s also a community that has had regular exposure to horrific loss.”

Mr Quick, who runs Management Sciences for Health, will introduce an address by former High Court judge Michael Kirby at the conference.

Activist and journalist Sean Strub, who runs the New York based POZ magazine, said the conference was shaken by the tragedy and by Professor Lange’s death.

“It’s going to be a very sombre week,’’ he said. “The struggle with the epidemic is bigger than any one individual but the collective loss of so many important people is one that is emotionally devastating.”

Kenyan development worker Perez Odera said she feared the tragedy would dissuade people from flying to conferences such as this.

“I just feel it is very, very unfortunate. It’s something we don’t have control over,’’ she said.

Dr Robert Grant, a researcher from the Gladstone Institute at the University of California, said that on arriving in Melbourne he had heard reports Prof Lange had died.

He declined to say he was speaking about Prof Lange ahead of confirmation of the death, but said a senior colleague — thought to be the Dutch researcher — appeared to have perished.

“It’s incredible. He’s been a mentor to me and an incredible leader in this field. We have published together and I have relied on him for advice and guidance,” he said.

Another delegate, Jennifer Watt, who works for a pharmaceutical company in San Francisco, talked of Prof Lange‘s work in Africa.

“I have worked very closely with him in a number of clinical research projects. He’s very well known and a very passionate person. He’s the father of AIDS research in the developing world,’’ she said.

Another attendee, Houston based community worker Moise Arrah, said the news was devastating. “People were coming here for such a noble cause and then they lose their lives in such a tragedy.”

Prof Lange was a clinical researcher specialising in HIV therapy who served as the International AIDS Society president from 2002 to 2004.

His friend Dr Seema Yasmin, from the US Centers for Disease Control, said Prof Lange was a true humanitarian.

“What a HUGE loss to the world,” she tweeted. “Just learned that dear friend, amazing father to 5 girls and veteran AIDS researcher Joep Lange was on #MH17.”

Australia’s National AIDS Trust paid tribute to Prof Lange.

“Reports Joep Lange died in Malaysian plane crash today, with other scientists on way to AIDS_conference. Desperately sad news,” it said on Twitter.

American academic and AIDS activist Gregg Gonsalves tweeted that “Lots of AIDS researchers, activists, officials on downed Malaysia Airlines flight to Melbourne for Intl AIDS Conference.

“Joep Lange was a leading AIDS researcher and clinician and an activist at heart. Lost today too soon on Malaysian flight 019. RIP.”

A Geneva-based World Health Organisation media adviser, Glenn Thomas, is also believed to be among the dead.

Dr Haileyesus Getahun, coordinator of the WHO’s Global TB program, tweeted: “Saddened to learn that my friend and @WHO staff who was traveling to @AIDS_conference to Melbourne was on flight #MH17. RIP #Glenn Thomas”.

His colleague Dr Rachel Baggaley, of the WHO’s HIV Department, told Vox: “I’m just devastated. He’s a very close colleague whom I work with on a daily basis.

“He just had his birthday, he was going to plan all sorts of celebrations.”

Nicole Schiegg, a former Senior Advisor at USAID, tweeted: “I am still stunned. So sorry & thoughts are with Glenn’s extended @WHO family at this time.

“Glenn was a great guy & will be missed.”

Jennifer Yang, global health reporter at the Toronto Star, tweeted: “So saddened to hear about lovely, funny, whip-smart Glenn.”

Delegates Lucie van Mens, Martine de Schutter, Pim de Kuijer and Jacqueline van Tongeren were also reportedly on the flight.

Dr Van Mens, director of program development and support at the Female Health Company, had been involved in public health, focusing on prevention of STIs and HIV/AIDS, since 1995.

Ms Van Tongeren had worked in the field of HIV/Aids since 1986, and coordinated many HIV/AIDS- and health-related projects. She ran an art gallery in Amsterdam in the 1970s and 1980s and worked closely with Prof Lange.

Organisers of the AIDS 2014 conference in Melbourne are awaiting confirmation of how many delegates were aboard the Malaysian Airlines flight shot down over eastern Ukraine.

International Aids Society president-elect Chris Beyrer issued a brief statement outside the Melbourne Convention Centre, where the world’s leading HIV researchers and scientists, former US president Bill Clinton and philanthropist Bob Geldolf will gather for next week’s conference.

“The International AIDS Society today expressed its sincere sadness at receiving news that colleagues and friends en route to attend the 20th International AIDS Conference taking place in Melbourne, Australia, were on board the Malaysian Airlines MH17 flight that has crashed over Ukraine earlier today,” Mr Beyrer said.

“At this incredibly said and sensitive time the IAS stands with our international family and sends condolences to the loved ones of those who have been lost to this tragedy.

“The IAS is hearing unconfirmed reports that some of our friends and colleagues were on board the flight and if that is the case this is a truly sad day.

“The IAS has also heard reports that among the passengers was a former IAS President Joep Lange and if that is the case then the HIV/AIDS movement has truly lost a giant.”

UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibe tweeted: “My thoughts & prayers to families of those tragically lost on flight #MH17. Many passengers were enroute to #AIDS2014 here in #Melbourne.”

The IAS released a statement today confirming the death of a number of attendees to the 20th Annual AIDS Conference.

“The International AIDS Society (IAS) today expresses its sincere sadness at receiving news that a number of colleagues and friends en route to attend the 20th International AIDS Conference taking place in Melbourne, Australia, were on board the Malaysian Airlines MH17 flight that has crashed over Ukraine earlier today,’’ it said.

“At this incredibly sad and sensitive time the IAS stands with our international family and sends condolences to the loved ones of those who have been lost to this tragedy.”

Bill Clinton, Bob Geldof, Michel Sidibe , the executive director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Mark Dybul, Indonesian Health Minister Nafsiam Mboi, Swedish Ambassador for Global Health Anders Nordstrom are down as speakers at the conference.

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

MH17: HIV community mourns loss of pioneer researcher Joep Lange

mvv489zq-1405649029

The international AIDS community is mourning the deaths of researchers whose plane was shot down over Ukraine and who were travelling to Melbourne for a global AIDS conference.

The former International AIDS Society president Joep Lange and his partner and ArtAids board member Jacqueline van Tongeren have been confirmed as having been on the flight, while there are reports of others including a World Health Organization spokesman, Glenn Thomas.

298 people – 283 passengers including three infants and 15 crew – were killed on the Malaysia Airlines flight 17.

Global leaders mourned

David Cooper, director of the Kirby Institute at UNSW Australia, was a friend of Joep Lange. He received a call at 3am telling him that Lange and his partner were on the flight.

Professor Cooper said his colleague of 30 years had “an absolute commitment to HIV treatment and care in Asia and Africa”.

“Joep was absolutely committed to the development of affordable HIV treatments, particularly combination therapies, for use in resource-poor countries,” Professor Cooper said.

Professor Lange was a professor of medicine and head of the Department of Global Health at the Academic Medical Centre at the University of Amsterdam. He served as president of the International AIDS Society from 2002 to 2004.

In his 30 years of researching HIV, he led pivotal trials of antiretroviral therapy and published more than 350 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

“Another outstanding area of [Lange’s] contribution has been his pioneering role in exploring affordable and simple antiretroviral drug regimens for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in resource-poor settings,” Professor Cooper said.

“Both of these have been part of his dedication to increasing access to effective HIV treatment.  The joy in collaborating with Joep was that he would always bring a fresh view, a unique take on things, and he never accepted that something was impossible to achieve.”

More AIDS2014 delegates feared lost

Australia’s Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has told reporters this morning: “A number of people who were travelling to Malaysia for an international AIDS conference were also on board”.

The Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was due to connect with a flight to Perth, before people travelled onto Melbourne, Reuters and others have reported.

UNAIDS director Michael Sidibe, who is already in Melbourne for the week-long 20th International Aids Conference, tweeted: “Many passengers were enroute to #AIDS2014 here in #Melbourne.”

The conference organisers, the International AIDS Society, released a statement expressing “sincere sadness” at the news of the M17 disaster:

At this incredibly sad and sensitive time the IAS stands with our international family and sends condolences to the loved ones of those who have been lost to this tragedy.

Story via The Conversation

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

Prominent HIV researcher Joep Lange was among the victims of flight MH17

foto joep lange_width200px

Joep Lange, a prominent HIV researcher and former president of the International AIDS Society, was one of the victims of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17.

A professor of medicine and head of the department of global health at the University of Amsterdam, Lange had been involved in HIV treatment and research since 1983, just as the virus was emerging as a global health threat.

He was one of the key researchers behind several pivotal antiretroviral therapy trials, including projects involving the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of the virus, according to the Amsterdam Institute of Global Health and Development.

Lange was on his way to AIDS 2014, a global conference that will take place in Melbourne, Australia from July 20 to 25, at the time of death.

He was traveling with his wife, who has also died in the crash.

“Joep was a visionary amongst HIV researchers,” American HIV researcher Dr. Rick Elion told Vox. “He was acutely aware of the multiple dimensions of HIV spanning science to society and had a heart of gold. This is a huge loss for the field.”

“Joep was absolutely committed to the development of affordable HIV treatments, particularly combination therapies, for use in resource-poor countries,” David Cooper, a friend and fellow researcher told the Australian academic news website The Conversation.

“Another outstanding area of [Lange’s] contribution has been his pioneering role in exploring affordable and simple antiretroviral drug regimens for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in resource-poor settings,” Cooper said.

Other researchers and activists have died en route to the AIDS conference, though the death toll has not yet been confirmed.

Australian newspapers are reporting that as many as 108 conference participants may have been on the plane.

The International AIDS Society issued a statement on the losses:

The IAS today expresses its sincere sadness at receiving news that a number of colleagues and friends en route to attend the 20th International AIDS Conference taking place in Melbourne, Australia, were on board the Malaysian Airlines MH17 flight that has crashed over Ukraine earlier today.

At this incredibly sad and sensitive time the IAS stands with our international family and sends condolences to the loved ones of those who have been lost to this tragedy.

We also at LASS, recognise this incredible loss of some some of the worlds finest scientific HIV activists and send our sympathies and heartfelt sorrow to the families of those who died yesterday on flight MH17.

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

Call for better education on HIV after survey

sex-ed

There’s a call for teenagers to be given clearer education about HIV.

A third of 12 to 17-year-olds wrongly think they can’t catch HIV through unprotected sex.  A panel of nearly 1,000 were surveyed by the charity the MAC Aids Fund between May and June.

Figures from the survey also suggest nearly 90% of teenagers believe they are not at risk of contracting HIV in their lifetime.  When asked if they had ever spoken about the topic, 42% of the panel said they hadn’t.

37% per cent of respondents thought smoking or drinking alcohol would be a greater risk to their health compared to 27% who thought having unprotected sex could be detrimental.

The Departments for Education in England, Scotland and Wales say students must learn about sexually transmitted infections like HIV.  The government has said “As part of the new science GCSE, pupils will also be taught about sexually transmitted infections, which will include HIV for the first time.”

According to Public Health England, in the 10 years to 2012 the number of gay men aged between 15 and 24 who were newly diagnosed with the virus more than doubled from 198 to 443.  The number of cases of men and women in this age group has dropped slightly from 508 to 505.

Their latest figures out in June suggest this age group also had the highest rate of sexually transmitted disease, with the number of new cases on the rise.

Alex Sparrowhawk found out he was HIV positive when he was 24 after having unprotected sex.  He told BBC Newsbeat: “I was aware of HIV, and knew it was a virus and how to catch it.  “But I didn’t think it would happen to someone like me. I presumed it would happen to other people.

It wasn’t something I ever thought of.

He explained that after having unprotected sex he “had a constant cough and the GP couldn’t give me answers so I went to get HIV tested”. Alex said he “couldn’t take it in” when he found out he had the virus.

He added: “I was quite numb. I didn’t understand what it would mean to me.

“There have been times I’ve not felt my best mentally, when I’ve thought ‘Is this really happening to me?’ “I can’t change the past, so I don’t regret it in that sense.

“At the end of the day I just think I was unlucky. But that’s just why I just want to raise awareness because that’s what’s going to happen to someone else.”

Alex, who has set up a blog detailing his experiences, said he didn’t learn about HIV or Aids in school and warned: “What you need to know is HIV is just a virus – it doesn’t care if you are gay or straight, black or white, male or female. It can affect anyone.”

Story via BBC Newsbeat

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

10 things you need to know about the pill to prevent HIV

The Magic Pill

It’s been called, simultaneously, a medicine to “end the HIV epidemic” and a “party drug:” Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP for short, refers to a daily antiviral treatment that prevents HIV.

That’s right: People who don’t have the virus can take a pill a day to save themselves from getting infected.

Haven’t heard about PrEP? You’re probably not alone. The drug-maker, Gilead, doesn’t advertise Truvada (its brand name) for prevention, and the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention only endorsed it this past May—two years after it hit the market.

Want to learn more about PrEP, (click here).

Going forward, however, you’ll be hearing a lot more. On Friday, the World Health Organization backed the antiviral, recommending all HIV-negative men who have sex with men consider taking it as part of a strategy to reduce the global incidence of the disease. But there’s a lot more to the story. Here’s what you need to know:

1) Public health officials aren’t recommending this pill for “all gay men,” despite what the headlines say

The pill is “for people who do not have HIV but who are at substantial risk of getting it,” according to CDC guidance. “At substantial risk” means you regularly have unprotected sex with partners of unknown HIV status. This can include men who have sex with men, heterosexual men and women, injection drug users, sex workers, and people in couples with an HIV-positive partner. In other words, not simply “all gay men.”

The latest headlines about Truvada were so misleading that the WHO had to issue a clarification noting that they support PrEP “as an additional choice”—again, not for all men who have sex with men.

“We know from surveillance that condom use is not as high as is necessary to control the epidemic”

2) Truvada is not a condom replacement

Public-health officials are not endorsing Truvada as an alternative to other forms of protection. “We are suggesting that for people who are already not using condoms, we have another option to help protect them from HIV infection,” says the CDC’s Dawn Smith, biomedical interventions implementation officer. “It’s part of being practical and realistic.” So the hope is that those who get prescriptions are folks who just aren’t using anything to protect themselves. “We know from our surveillance systems that condom use is not as high as is necessary to control the epidemic,” Smith added.

3) We don’t yet know exactly how the drug will be used in real life

Still, this public-health message hasn’t stopped some activists and AIDS campaigners from worrying aloud that the pill will undermine traditional advocacy messages about condoms—especially at a time when HIV infections are on the rise among gay men. And the truth is, we don’t yet know what kind of impact PrEP will have on people’s behaviour.

To find out, there are now “demonstration trials” being run around the world. These will look at how Truvada works outside of clinical trials, the impact of non-daily use of the drug, and whether the antiviral encourages more risky sexual behaviour or leads to an increase in other sexually-transmitted infections.

4) We do know Truvada only works effectively when taken every day

A three-year clinical trial of PrEP in HIV-negative men who have sex with men found that users got much more protection when they took the drug every day. Participants who took the drug less than half the time had a 50 percent reduction in HIV acquisition; daily users cut their risk by more than 90 percent. These results have been supported by other studies in a range of populations—from injection-drug users to heterosexual men and women. The trouble is, most people don’t take their medications as their doctors prescribe.

Drug-resistant strains of HIV have emerged when people with acute, undetected infection were given Truvada

5) Truvada can cause drug-resistant HIV infection

Drug-resistant strains of HIV have emerged when people with acute, undetected infection were given PrEP. This means they were positive when they started the medicine, but levels of the virus in their blood were hardly detectable because their infections were so new. They hadn’t made enough antibodies to show up in a test and so they were prescribed the drug anyway.

There’s some question about how serious this risk is for individuals and public health. For now, doctors are asked to confirm the HIV status of patients and to do follow-up and re-testing throughout treatment.

When asked how much of a concern drug resistance is, Smith of the CDC said, “We don’t know yet. That’s one of the things we’ll learn as the first few demonstration projects begin telling us.”

6) Besides that, it’s pretty safe

Though Truvada for the prevention of HIV was only licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in 2012, it was first authorized in 2004 to treat HIV positive patients. That’s right: the same drug used for these two purposes. Since it has been on the market as a treatment for over a decade—with very minimal side effects and harms—doctors are pretty confident in its safety profile for preventative use. There seem to be few side-effects with Truvada for prevention, the most common one being nausea.

People have been slinging the term ‘Truvada whore’ around, and the head of the aids healthcare foundation called the pill a ‘party drug’

7) “Truvada whores” are a thing

Because of the questions about whether PrEP will cause people to have risky sex and ditch condoms, there’s some related stigma in the gay community. People have even been slinging the term “Truvada whore” around, and the head of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation called Truvada a “party drug.” In response, one PrEP activist created a #TruvadaWhore t-shirt campaign to reclaim the word.

Many have pointed out that this divide parallels the early days of the birth control pill and suggestions that the medication would encourage promiscuity.

8) Uptake has been slow—but that’s not the full story

According to data from the drug maker Gilead, by March 2013 there were approximately 1,774 people in the US taking the drug. But it’s important to put this number in context. First of all, these findings were not published and peer-reviewed; they were presented at a scientific conference last year. When studied, we’ll have a better picture of the PrEP landscape and it may look quite different.  Secondly, Truvada has only been on the US market for prevention since 2012, a year after these numbers were gathered. It often takes decades for innovations to penetrate a market, especially in the conservative field of medicine.

9) The drug is expensive

Without insurance, Truvada can cost up to $14,000 a year, according to the CDC. But for most people, it is covered in their insurance programs and there’s only a co-pay. There are also medication assistance programs across the US for the uninsured that will cover the entire cost of the medication.

10)  HIV remains a socio-economic crisis around the world

Globally, men who have sex with men, prisoners, injection-drug users, and sex workers are still the groups most affected by HIV.

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy

Will Corder: The Face of HIV

Image from "The Face of HIV" (Corder: 2014) Image © Will Corder used with permission.

Image from “The Face of HIV” (Corder: 2014)
Image © Will Corder 2014 used with permission.

Will Corder is a photographer in Bournemouth who produces portraiture, fashion and documentary work as well as working on personal and commercial projects.

His photography journey so far has seen him work with fashion photographers including Cameron Mcnee and Michael Furlonger, and work for Top Model UK.  Will has also exhibited his solo work in Dorset and worked with local charities and organisations on collaborative projects.  Will has also had his work published in national press and magazines.

Of particular note, one of his more interesting projects is “The Face of HIV”, which is an ongoing project to raise awareness about HIV and the people that it affects.  Ignorance, stigma, silence and denial surround HIV and it’s something that needs to be addressed.  Since the ’80′s, HIV has gone from being a ‘gay’ disease which came with a death sentence, to a manageable condition which affects anyone – gay, straight, white, black, young and old.

This project features some remarkable people who have faced HIV and fought it, people who want to tell their story and educate others.

Will’s “The Face of HIV” series are remarkably similar in style to celebrated photographer David Bailey, who often presents black and white thematic photographs of the famous.  In Stardust (Bailey: 2014) David Bailey has captured: actors, writers, musicians, filmmakers, designers, models, artists and people encountered on his travels; many of them are already known to us.

Will has shifted individuals, victims of stigma and abuse simply because of a manageable health condition, into fine art.  We all too often see parades of red ribbons and of communities working together to fight stigma and the visual impact of the individual can sometimes be lost.  Will has brought you the individual, boldly displayed for you to see, not to scrutinise or guess their character but to show their innocence.  You couldn’t possibly judge these people as you have no terms of reference and this a practical demonstration why prejudice and stigma originate in the mind of the perpetrator.

In his YOU series (Hilterman: 2002 – 2013) Hans Hilterman accomplishes the same, stripping people to their very essence, with no makeup, jewellery, or other preference.  Corder presents his noteworthy individuals as a synonymity between the unexceptional characters of Hilterman’s YOU and the mahatma of fame from Bailey’s Stardust.

Despite it’s message and what it it stands for, you cannot see HIV within Corder’s The Face of HIV, no ghost, no trace.  Nor flower, not a seed nor symbols in it’s place.

A remarkable project, from a remarkable photographer.

Visit his portfolio at: http://www.willcorder.co.uk/or follow him on Twitter @will_corder

STAY UPDATED
Follow LASS on Twitter
or subscribe by email
Visit Well For Living
for well-being news and info or follow_THEM-a copy